Streaming Services

Streaming Services

Using an antenna for a lot of people is a great way of saving money on television but there are lots of cheaper alternative methods of getting more content than an antenna along.  The number one reason a lot of people do not drop cable or satellite is because of watching sports or some specialty channel.  The good news is there are several methods to save lots of money as well as only pay for what you actually watch.   I would say that the first 3 and probably the most popular of the streaming services are:
1. Netflix  ($7.99 and up. There are choices for number and quality of stream.)
2. Amazon Prime (just because you most likely pay for it but maybe not using it. It is free with your Prime Membership but can be purchased as a standalone service for $8.99)
3. Hulu  ($7.99 and up with a commercial limited version for $11.99)
All 3 of these services are now providing original content as well as a rotating list of movies and television show.

Now if you can't live without the cable channels:

1. SlingTV (Starts at $20/month.  It is currently the cheapest streaming service.  I had a few issues with some video stuttering when I used the service but made it through a season of  college and NFL football.
2. Playstation Vue (Starts at $29.99/month.  It has more channels and has a built in cloud DVR.  I liked the service but left when it lost multiple Viacom channels.)
3. DirecTVNow (Starts at $35/month.  I am currently using this service and like it better than the others so far.  The lack of DVR is made up for by lots of shows and channels having On-Demand and pause capabilities.)

The only drawback to these solutions are there is no local channel support. Slingtv, however, has a new device that allows local channels and its service to be used in a single interface. You still have to use your own antenna so I would forgo buying a device to do this since your tv already can do this.

All of these plans allow you to cancel at anytime without any contract.  I expect that there will be lots more companies jump into these types of services in the next year or so.

Lifehacker.com has an even more detailed analysis of the 3 cable/satellite replacements.  It is a little longer article but definetly worth the read.